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Could hemp be your cup of tea?

Posted by ARobinson 18/10/2019 0 Comment(s)

There’s a tea revolution brewing and it’s one you need to know about. The classic cuppa is being usurped in many households by a new beverage with benefits. But is hemp tea the new black or merely a storm in a teacup?

 

Herbal teas

 

 

Herbal teas are nothing new either. In the 1st century AD, the Greek physician and pharmacologist Dioscorides describes 600 medicinal plants which could be used for the preparation of infusions. Since the 1980s, herbal teas have become progressively more popular in the UK. Hundreds of varieties are now available featuring a cornucopia of potentially beneficial ingredients from chamomile to mint and from ginger to ginseng.

 

 

With so many teas at your disposal, why should hemp tea find its way to the top of your wish list?

 

 

Why organic Hemp tea?

 

 

Rich in antioxidants and featuring CBD, minor cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids, hemp tea should pique your interest.

 

 

Flavanoids are antioxidants and are found in fruit and vegetables. Each combination of flavanoids works slightly differently but antioxidants are known to fight free radicals. These are chemicals which promote the process of oxidation in your cells. Scientists have discovered as many as 4,000 antioxidants in plant-based foods. These could explain why a vegetarian diet appears to reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer, arthritis, aging, cataracts, memory loss, stroke, inflammation, and infection.

 

 

Organic hemp tea also contains CBD and we are guessing that, as you are reading the CBD Liquid Lab blog, you are acquainted with the potential benefits of this compound. But hemp tea also contains CBDA, an interesting cannabinoid which is considered to have therapeutic potential. It hasn’t been researched extensively but could boast anti-inflammatory and anti-nausea properties together with a calming effect.

 

 

Hemp tea could help you sleep

 

 

Millions of us suffer from insomnia and hemp tea could help. Further research is needed but many drinkers of hemp tea claim that the quality of their sleep has improved. Hemp tea certainly feels relaxing. It could be that merely switching from a beverage with caffeine to hemp tea will do the trick.

 

 

Hemp tea could relieve stress

 

 

We all experience stress in our lives and any relief is always welcome. Hemp tea drinkers have reported that they have experienced stress relief and reduced anxiety. We can’t claim that it is the hemp tea that has helped them. You can only sip and see!

 

 

Hemp tea could address digestive issues

 

 

Busy lives and poor diets can lead to digestive issues and nausea. The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology has published studies illustrating the anti-nausea properties of the CBD found in hemp tea.

 

 

Organic Hemp Tea Bags

 

 

Our organic hemp tea bags provide a quick and easy way to enjoy the benefits of hemp tea including the pleasantly earthy taste. The tea is created from hemp buds and these give the tea its distinctive green colour. The plants are matured so as to maximise both the CBD content and the inviting herbal aroma. The tea is prepared in the same way as your usual cuppa and can be modified to suit your taste with sugar, milk or lemon.

 

 

It is important to remember that CBD is not water soluble. You can solve this problem by introducing a little oil to your brew. This could be coconut oil, butter or even full fat milk.

 

 

Whether you switch to hemp tea completely or simply enjoy the occasional cup, you are in for a treat. Only you can discover what hemp tea could do for you and now would be a good time to find out!

 

 

A brief history of tea

 

 

We’re a nation of tea drinkers to the extent that a traditional cuppa is considered to be quintessentially British. Our lengthy love affair with the beverage began as early as the 17th century and shows no sign of abating. The first newspaper advertisement for Chinese Tcha was published in 1658. Fast forward to September 2016 and tea was being celebrated in a Google doodle featuring a tea bag with a Union Jack.

 

 

Tea was originally drunk for medicinal purposes. It was Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II, who made it fashionable with the nobility and it wasn’t long before the middle classes jumped on the bandwagon. The Government began to tax tea, ensuring that it was beyond the pockets of the working class. But tea smuggling became rife and eventually William Pitt the Younger removed the taxes. By the middle of the 18th century, tea was the country’s most popular drink, replacing ale and gin.

 

 

Of course, tea didn’t originate in the UK. Tea containers have been discovered in Chinese tombs dating back to the Han Dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD). By the 9th century, it was the national drink of China. It soon became an important aspect of Japanese culture and then spread across the globe.

 

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